Interview With Author Adam Cheshier

Please introduce yourself and your book(s)!

I’ve been writing fiction for several years with many unpublished stories and memoirs, however, Summer of ‘92 is the first novel which has been published under Wanderway Publishing House. You can purchase a paperback copy or digital e-book on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Summer-92-Adam-J-Cheshier/dp/1724181270/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=summer+of+%2792&qid=1556034756&s=gateway&sr=8-3

What is/are the story(ies) behind your book(s)?

An eclectic, worldly group of twenty-somethings get caught up in bad habits and sobering decisions. Jack, Liv and the rest of the gang had it all – and then they lost it in a flash. Things go south quick and their problems keep compounding until your heart gets anxious for them.

Here’s the blurb:

There are three things I learned that summer I’m absolutely sure of. . .

First, skinny waists and drug habits will almost certainly lead to bad decisions. Second, groupthink is toxic. One should never trust their livelihood on the shoulders of others. Last, don’t get stuck in the middle of a drug war.

That’s exactly where we found ourselves in the summer of 1992. After our unlikely cast of expatriates grew attached to one another, it was only a matter of time before reality got up from under us.

We lived in the fast lane, right next to love and lust and unbounded by societal limits. It’s a miracle any of us made it out alive – if only it wasn’t at the expense of people we cared for. Was it too late to make things right?

What inspires/inspired your creativity?

Several inspirations went into the writing of Summer of ‘92. I was in a vintage art stage as I wrote practically the entire novel. Vintage photography, videography, poetry, and classic travel novels – as always – from the Beat Generation and Lost Generation.

How do you deal with creative block?

Take a break. Go outside. Take a walk. Travel. Experience something new. Engage in conversation with someone you don’t normally. Feel alive.

How do bad reviews and negative feedback affect you and how do you deal with them?

I can never take a good review as genuine. Therefore, I only take the negative reviews at face value. Depending on what is said, sometimes it is difficult to put behind me. Sometimes, I don’t want to put the negative behind. It sits in my brain as I write and I want to develop myself right away. However, everything as a writer takes time. Practice, patience, and more writing.

How has your creation process improved over time?

I now know when to write and when to put down the ‘pen’ and distract myself. There is no forcing fiction writing. It is either with you at the time or it isn’t. There’s no in-between. If you aren’t sure your words are flowing, chances are they’re not.

What were the best, worst and most surprising things you encountered during the entire process of completing your book(s)?

The editing process for Summer of ‘92 was trying. My editors and I didn’t see eye-to-eye on many of the story-line patch-ups and re-writes.

Do you tend towards personal satisfaction or aim to serve your readers? Do you balance the two and how?

I write for myself. Every writer must write for him/herself first or else it is reflected in the work.

What role do emotions play in creativity?

I am constantly trying to access a deeper side of my emotions within my work. Sometimes, it is difficult to put emotional words to paper.

Do you have any creativity tricks?

Music, music, music. With the right playlist, creativity flows.

What are your plans for future books?

I’m constantly starting books – mostly travel-related – waiting for the right one to click. I want to tell a story that comes to me automatically like Summer of ‘92. Until then, I will keep writing short stories of my travel adventures which you can follow along with on my blog (www.wanderwayer.com).

Tell us some quirky facts about yourself

I have been four years a nomad which has taken me to over 40 countries and got me into countless sticky situations. Currently, I’m serving a three year ban from 27 countries in Europe for overstaying my visa. I even spent five days in a Croatian jail cell because of it.

Author: NFReads.com

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